Rules For Posting To This Blog and Weekly Blog Question

1. Only use your first name (no last names, addresses, IM screen names, etc.)
2. Show respect and consideration of others when posting and commenting. This includes individuals, students, organizations, political parties, colleagues, etc.
3. Check all posts for spelling and grammar errors before posting.
4. Protect the privacy of others. Gain permission from other people before you write about them. Avoid sharing someone else's last name. Use job titles or pseudonyms when writing about experiences with your co-workers or students.
5. Watch your language. Use politically correct and non-offensive language.
6. Make sure you write about things that are factual.
7. Keep your postings education-oriented. Avoid discussing plans for the weekend, etc.

FINAL BLOG POST - OUR "DAILY TRIPLE" (DUE 12/1).
This week I would like you to use your imagination. You have just won the lottery and will leave your teaching post immediately to travel around the world. As you leave your keys you meet your replacement. You are asked to give this new teacher just ONE piece of advice. What would that be, and why? Enjoy your world expedition!

Blog Post - Week 7
This past week in my own teaching I felt a little disconnected which prompts my question to you, "What was the moment (or moments) when I felt most disconnected or disengaged as a teacher - the moment(s) I said to myself, I'm just going through the motions here?"

Fall Semester 2016 Blog Post - Week 6
For the past couple of weeks you have experienced asynchronous online learning (doing modules by yourself). Previously this semester you have experienced synchronous online learning (all together in the Collaborate room). Which do you think is more effective and why do you think that? Which do you like better, and why?

Fall Semester 2016 Blog Post - Week 5
This week we have what we call "open mic." You can write a post about anything related to your teaching that you would like responses from your classmates.

Fall Semester 2016 Blog Post - Week 4
Here is this week's question: "What was the event that most took me surprise this week - and event that shook me up, caught me off guard, gave me a jolt, or made me unexpectedly happy?"

Fall Semester 2016 Blog Post - Week 3
Please write a post about the following question, "In thinking about my past week teaching what is one thing I would do differently, and why?"

Fall Semester 2016 Blog Post - Week 2
Please write a post about the following question, " In thinking about my teaching activities this past week, of what do I feel most proud? Why?"

Fall Semester 2016 Blog Post - Week 1
Describe something you used in your program in the first weeks of school that you learned in the summer NTI program. How did it work? Did it get you off to a stronger start than last year?

Sunday, October 26, 2014

Information Literacy

Unfortunately, there are a number of different sources students can acquire information from, and not all of these sources are accurate or reliable.  In my profession of healthcare, given its relevance to life, this information can be detrimental not only to the careless reader who doesn't due diligence in fact-checking, but also to those they might have direct or indirect influence on. 

I don't think all information is equal, accurate, or worthy of our attention.  There is truly a spectrum of information available out there, ranging from good to bad and with all sorts of "in-betweens".  Good information is characterized by being reliable, understandable, up-to-date, and sources of the author's data should be cited.  Some information may be more suitable for laymen, but the content could be so light, allowing for slanting of the information.  Information can be adulterated with images and headings contrived by the author to get the readers attention, however the information itself could be flawed.  Some forms of information are heavy in content, scripted solely to appeal to a select sect of individuals. 

Personally, I tend to obtain my information from a few reputable resources that are well known to those in the healthcare field such as E-medicine, Web MD, NIH, CDC, Up-to-Date, MD consult, and a whole host of textbooks that I am familiar with from my med school days (updated versions of course).  If I stumble across any alternative sources of information, I try to fact-check by analyzing who the author is, what sources they quote, how reliable those sources are, the date the information was published, and when was it last updated.  I teach my students these same principles of information literacy. 

Dwight Colbert



3 comments:

Tawanna Cummings said...

Dwight,
Thank you for providing names of reputable resources that you use in the classroom. I agree some information suitable for laymen can be misinterpreted because of the lack of detailed facts.

C Middlebrooks said...

I think the research process goes a lot smoother when we give our students a list of credible sources. In my field, law, I like to use findlaw.com, cornell, lexis nexus, textbooks, and law books that I have collected over the years. I also find that when teaching information literacy I have to teach them about outdated information and its reliability.

C Middlebrooks said...

I think the research process goes a lot smoother when we give our students a list of credible sources. In my field, law, I like to use findlaw.com, cornell, lexis nexus, textbooks, and law books that I have collected over the years. I also find that when teaching information literacy I have to teach them about outdated information and its reliability.